Select Your Language

WMD - Geiger Counter

The WMD Geiger Counter is an entirely new sound and it will blow your mind. It is basically a loud modern preamp driving a digital wave destroyer, creating sounds which range from nice to total madness.

Delivery Time: Out of stock

€279.00
Incl. 19% Tax

The WMD Geiger Counter is an entirely new sound and it will blow your mind. It is basically a loud modern preamp driving a digital wave destroyer, creating sounds which range from nice (light overdrive, added gain, increased harmonic content) to total madness (impossible amounts of gain, multiple octave foldover, terrible digital noise).

 

Features:




- High gain modern preamp

- Dramatic tone control with disable

- Sample rate from 260hz to 58khz

- 1 to 8 bit depth with mask mode

- 252 wave table modulator

- Key in for expressive control

- Cv or signal key in modes

- Always saves settings

- Hand wired true bypass

- Top quality components

- Super hard epoxy powder finish

- Standard 9v power jack

 

Controls:

 

- Gain: Low settings provide clean tones with no distortion at all, while high settings will brickwall

  your signal for great sustain. Use the gain control as a coarse setting for getting the desired tone

  from the selected wave table.

 

- Tone: The geiger counter's tone control blends muffled low-mids with chimey and clear upper mids

  and highs providing a very large range of sounds in junction with the gain. All the way down and the

  sound is muffled and grungy with little upper harmonic content. The middle range is smooth and full

  bodied. the top range cuts the lows completely for only upper harmonic content. use the tone to fine

  tune the sound of the wave table.

 

- Tone enable/disable: This switch removes the tone control from the preamp circuit. The tone control

  sucks some volume from the gain, and this allows the pure ultra hot signal to go directly into the wave

  table. If a very clean tone is desired, set to disable and adjust the gain to get the right amount of breakup.

  For most wave tables, disabling the tone will produce completely different sounds by brickwalling to the

  extremes of the tables faster.

 

- Sample rate: Controls the length of the samples your signal is converted into. full up and the geiger

  counter samples faster than a cd. Dial it down a little and you'll lower the fidelity and frequency response,

  adding overtones and difference frequencies. Down a little produces some very nice chimey clean tones.

  Down more and higher notes disappear into difference frequencies, all the way down to 280hz. The

  sample rate is sort of like a flange whammy.

 
- Bit depth: This controls the finer details of the signal. All up and your signal is represented by the full

  8 bits. Each step down cuts the resolution in half, adding quantization error distortion, all the way down

  to 1 bit making a nasty square wave from a once clean tone. This produces a lo-fi gated distortion sound.

  The led by the bit depth knob shows the key input and post/pre wave table modes. 

 

- Bits/mask: This switch controls how the bit depth knob works. in bits mode, the bit depth knob reduces

  the resolution of the signal. In mask mode, the signal is filtered through a number (0 to 255). This mode

  can be used to reduce noise and add gain. in pre wave table mode, it can turn off small ranges of the wave

  table, creating altered harmonic content from the tables. Adjust the knob to taste when in mask mode.

 

- Wave table: This knob and display select the wave table to run your signal through. The wave table stage

  takes your signal and destroys it with math. This produces some incredible sounds. The wave tables are

  organized so that a more extreme version is typically found one up from the current one. There are 252 wave

  tables in all, each with different harmonic content. 

 

- Key input: The key input on the geiger counter is similar to the key input on the fatman. use any external

  signal to modulate the sample rate or bit depth. A slow lfo creates some incredible sweeping difference

  frequencies when modulating the sample rate, a faster lfo creates some cool tremolo sounds when modulating

  the bit depth. 

 

- Sample rate key in: In normal mode (led not green) the knob controls the sample rate directly. turn it green and

  the key input controls the sample rate. Turn the knob all the way up and the key input has direct control. dial it

  down to introduce variations and interesting patterns in the sample rate.

 

- Bit depth key in: In normal mode (led not green) the knob controls the bit depth directly. if green, the key input

  controls the bit depth. With the knob all the way up, the key in will have smooth control. dial it down to introduce

  graininess and patterns from the key input. Key input works with both bits and mask modes.

 




Owner´s manual for WMD Geiger Counter

User reviews for WMD Geiger Counter at Harmony Central

More WMD Geiger Counter-Videos on Youtube

 



 






Source: jimmah01

 

Geiger Counter without audio input:






Source: insomniyack

 

 

Additional Information

Brand WMD Effects

Reviews

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

Customer Reviews

  • Rating
    it has been a truly new effect since 50 years of basically the same ideas of sound treatment of guitar etc.
    Review by Hans(on 4/22/2016)
    You might want to wait for the - much more expensive - pro-version, but the Geiger Counter should i.m.o. not really need for instance a mixknob. Your signal deserves to be manipulated in full by this beast, not with al little in a mix with your dry signal!
    In just one weekend I managed to produce some 20 amazing and musical sounds that, together with my feedback loops and Ola chorus, left my neighbourhood deserted.
    Oh yes, you can destroy your input in every thinkable way, but it's the musical enhancement of your sound that's the most amazing thing about the GC, and impossible to get with any other pedal. WMD has done an incredible job with their 'counters'!

    Hans, Netherlands